Tips For Training Dogs Successfully

August 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Dog Tips, Dog Training

Tips For Training Dogs Successfully

Training dogs is not a hard. You just need patience, dedication and some simple tactics and you will teach them successfully.

Here are five top tips on how to train your dogs successfully:

1. To avoid your dog getting confused and so that they can learn to recognize commands easily only one person should be responsible for training the dog initially. If too many people are trying to train the dog at the same time this can stop progress in its tracks.

2. You should use positive reinforcements. If the dog does something good, you should reward this behavior so that he will know that what he did was right. If the dog cannot understand or follow your commands, never push him. Dogs are not as intelligent as humans, they make mistakes. What you should understand is that they won’t easily understand your commands in just one teaching, it takes repetition to train a dog successfully. Do not scold your dog as he might develop fear which will hinder his learning and willingness to be trained. You can use treats in order to encourage your dogs, although don’t overdue it.

3. Teach commands one at a time. Try to teach him one command after the other. If he cannot absorb it, try to stay on that command only because adding additional commands will just confuse the dog. Start with the basics.

4. In executing commands, you should keep your voice cheerful so that the dog will happily follow your commands. Dogs will respond to a low and coaxing voice. If you shout out loud, he may become startled and unresponsive.

5. Train your dog in various places. If you keep your dogs in a certain place like your home, he will not be able to adjust with the environment new people. Take him to the park or through the neighborhood. This will help your dog associate with other dogs and people.

Training your dog can sometime be tough, but it will be worth it. In the end, you will be the one to benefit when your dog is trained. You don’t know he might even save your life one day and pay back everything you taught him.

Dog Training: Tips and Tricks to Stop Your Dog From Digging in Your Yard

August 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Dog Tips, Dog Training

Dog Training: Tips and Tricks to Stop Your Dog From Digging in Your Yard

It’s downright infuriating to look out the window and see Buddy digging another hole in the yard. You yell out the window; he may or may not even acknowledge he’s heard anything; then back to the digging. This dog behavior has got to stop.

WHY DOGS DIG…..

Did you ever stop to think WHY Buddy digs? (except to make you mad!). This is the real trick – to figure out why he’s digging in the first place, the motivation behind the dog behavior. Then you can take dog training steps to discourage it, redirect that energy and possibly stop it completely.

1. I’M BORED!

Location: Digging along the fence lines and at the gate.

Why? He is bored and wants to get out for some action.

Solution: Provide more exercise for your dog, both physical and mental. The more exercise the better, according to your dog. A tired, happy dog will rest nicely between great outings.

2. I’M HOT!!

Location: Digging along the edge of the house or shallow “pits,” especially in the heat of the summer.

Why? Your dog is most likely creating a cool spot in the cool under-earth. If under the porch, he’s creating a den.

Solution: Check to make sure you are providing fresh cool water throughout the day and night.

Is there adequate shade to protect your dog from the hot sun? Is good air circulation available or possibly a nice breeze? Or is the space filled with stagnant air?

Provide plant life (trees, bushes) for shelter from the hot sun. Cool grass keeps the ground heat down.

3. IT’S JUST MY NATURE!

Sometimes it’s the breed of dog, not so much the environment. Some breeds tend to be burrowers — hounds, huskies, malamutes are a few examples.

Solution: If this is the case, work with your dog to agree on a place he can do his thing and camouflage it with something like plants or fencing.

4. I LIKE IT!!

Some dogs just like to dig, and dig they will, no matter how much you yell and scream.

Solution: Create and help them with the ideal digging place — a sandy blend with hidden treasures that reward digging at that spot. Having a prepared area encourages the digger to focus the digging to the area you set up in an out-of-the-way place. Remember to keep the area stocked with assorted treats and toys.

TO FILL OR NOT TO FILL ….. EXISTING HOLES

The second part of the story is…..

What to do with the holes that keep reappearing, no matter what you do? Have you back-filled holes dug by your dog only to find them dug again, over and over?

When this happens, the next stage of hole-filling is called for.

You might think this next step it involves yelling at your dog, or rapping on the window. Nope. Are you really going to stand and stare out the window hoping to correct the situation while it’s happening (which would be the only way to really correct it using this method)?

TECHNIQUES FOR “FILLING” HOLES

There are two better techniques to encourage your dog to rethink digging that hole.

The easier of the two is to fill the hole until almost full. Mix the last portion of dirt with dog poo, pinecones, moth balls, or other repelling non-harmful substance. The next time your dog arrives for the big dig, he quickly finds the game has changed. Most dogs quickly change their behavior.

The second method is more time consuming but effective. Cut a section of chicken wire or similar to cover the hole plus 8 inches or more. Dig a hole a few inches deep that surrounds the hole and will fit the wire shape.

Fill the hole and then press wire in place and cover with dirt. Pack the area well, particularly around the wire edges. When your dog returns, the wire will stop his digging progress.

If along a fence line, secure the wire to the fence along the inside of the fence, just a short distance from the ground. When the wire gets to the ground, keep going vertically a short distance underground. Then bend the wire so the bottom is perpendicular to the top (forms an L). Bury the horizontal part underground inside the fence, pointing away from the fence. When your dog digs he is stopped by the wire and his weight on the earth helps keep the wire in place. The result is the dog gives up on that area.

Pretty cool, huh?!

CONCLUSION

We humans see digging as bad dog behavior. Dogs don’t, and they dig for different reasons. If you can figure out why they’re digging, you can put dog training steps in place to stop it. Some dogs dig, that’s what they do. Set them up a space to dig and you both win!

Try these dog training techniques to change unwanted dog behavior. They seriously work.

The Lowdown on Dog Clicker Training

August 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Dog Training

The Lowdown on Dog Clicker Training

Dog training is a necessity when you make the decision to keep a dog as a pet.Dogs, particularly larger ones, must be obedient, or keeping them becomes extremely hard work.

In addition to their appreciation for being fed, as pack animals dogs have natural instincts that favour training. These instincts are manifested as a desire to please a trainer. This gives the dog trainer an unbeatable edge in shaping the dog’s behaviour.

While dogs can be trained for complicated, serious actions, such as rescue work, circus acts, or medical diagnosis, there are certain elements of training that almost all dogs can learn, to the benefit of both dog and trainer.

Basically, dog training is about communication. The trainer is communicating to the dog what behaviours are correct in what circumstances. A successful trainer must also understand the communication that the dog sends to the them. The dog can signal that he is unsure, confused, nervous, happy, excited, etc. The emotional state of the dog is an important consideration in directing the training.

Dog training clickers are great training tools. They are effective training tools for puppies or dogs because dog clickers make a very distinct sound, letting you control your timing, and eliminate the inflection in your voice that can hinder dog training.

Dogs are very sensitive to inflections in your voice, and training your dog with a clicker eliminates the inflections and you can train more effectively, even if you are in a crabby mood or are getting short-tempered during the training session.

Now that you’ve got a dog clicker it is time to train your dog to get used to the tool. First thing, get a pocket full of small, edible treats ready and, for easy access, get a nice clicker treat bag. Then you can lure the dog with the treat or go to the dog with the clicker and some treats.

Click the clicker, and give the dog a nice treat. At this point, it doesn’t matter what he’s doing at the moment, since you basically are training your dog to learn that when there’s a click there’s a treat. You can continue the process of making clicks and rewarding with treats until you’ve trained your dog to react quickly with the turn of his head and he gives you all his attention when he hears the sound of the clicker. This process probably won’t really take much time, but you’ve got to make him react with your clicker before you move on to the next clicker training step.

Whatever stage of training you have reached,or whatever method of training you may have chosen, always remember these golden rules;

1. Be Positive — It is necessary to use positive reinforcement when you train your dog or puppy by offering some dog treats and a lot of praise if he does something correctly. During the initial training sessions you can offer both praise and treats.

2. Firm and Friendly — When you give commands such as stay and come, you want to use a happy, friendly voice. On the other hand, you will want a lower, firmer voice for sit, down, and stay.

3. Start Young…but not too early – The ideal time to start training begins at six to eight weeks, maybe even earlier depending on the puppy. But remember, you can teach old dogs new tricks.

4. Be Patient – Patience is vital when you work with your dog or puppy. If you feel like you’re at the end of your rope before you’ve even started, don’t attempt to train your dog. Your dog is incredibly smart and will pick up on your emotions.

5. Keep it Short – Fifteen minutes or so is about the right time for learning simple commands, so consentrate on a single command a session and end it on a positive note. If your dog or pup has successfully done the command several times in a row remember to smother him with praise. After the dog training session, spend some time playing. He will associate time with you as positive and look forward to his training.

6. No Distractions – Try to pick a quiet place free of distractions when training your dog. A secluded garden or a quiet inside room works best. If there are other pets in the family, put them separate so they won’t interfere with training.

7. Remember,both you and the dog should enjoy. – Dog training, of course, should be a pleasant time for you and your dog. The time can be used to bond closely with your dog and learn each other’s personalities. When you do this, you will not only have a well-trained dog or puppy, but a longtime, loyal companion and friend.

Dog Behavior Training To Housebreak Your Puppy

August 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Dog Training

Dog Behavior Training To Housebreak Your Puppy

Are you ready to find the puppy housebreaking solutions you have been searching for? I’m glad you found my article. Sit back and relax and I believe you will learn a thing or two.

Housebreaking is the most indispensable thing your puppy needs to learn. Ordinary sound judgment ought to reveal to you why. Do you hope for your home to stay spic and span’ Take care of your puppy’s housebreaking thoroughly. Besides the preservation of your general domestic hygiene, trained dogs are contented dogs. As creatures of habit, it’s in their make-up to maintain schedules as pack animals. Here is how you ought to housebreak your puppy:

Best Housebreaking Age

At the time your puppy attains the age of 8 to 12 weeks old, it’s highly appropriate to start housebreaking. Bear in mind that slogan that old dogs can’t learn new tricks’ It is accurate so why take a chance?

Using a Crate Helps

Dog trainers recommend using a crate in housebreaking your puppy. A crate is similar to a cage, having you can see through bars and a locking door that locks. Its area ought to fit sufficiently the dogs dimensions for it to move about in. It ought to be utilized similar to a dog’s bedroom. It is advised to not confine your puppy in his crate for longer than two hours at a time.

The thinking supporting using a crate in housebreaking your puppy is that dogs would not foul their areas where they sleep areas. Nevertheless, he may do so if you confine him in somewhere for longer than he can keep it in. At no time use a crate to penalize your dog, it would boomerang. Usually, pups that are three-months old have to deal with nature’s needs every 3 hours, so you ought to lead him to a special out of doors comfort location more frequently.

Teach Your Puppy To Learn Routines

An additional tip is to exit the residence through one way out exclusively. This way out ought to be the one that you desire your dog to scratch to advise you concerning his being called by nature.

Taking your pup out at approximately the identical times every day would be extremely useful for the both of you. This would assist in establishing a habit, and would force him learn to keep it in waiting for you to become ready to accompany him out.

Watch For Clues

If your un-housebroken dog is used to roaming unrestricted about the home, look for signs that indicate to you he needs to do it. Be absolutely watchful enough of his behavior, i.e., a lot of sniffing, circling an room, staring at the door with a strong expression on his face, etc. If you discover him as he is relieving himself, halt him using a rapid snatch of his collar and draw it up at the same time asserting “No” using your bass, strict tone (don’t forget to use a deep, surly speech as you state stating commands). Subsequently, accompany him into the outdoors and let him conclude what he had started. Afterwards, pat him on his head while stating “Good (his name)!” It is a must to have your dog get accustomed to getting praised whenever he does anything that makes you pleased. Offering him treats as a bonus whenever he does his business in the appropriate place can be very useful, too.

Being Patient is a Big Asset

Similar to any disciplinary endeavor, housebreaking requires a lot of tolerance. If you absolutely hate washing your dog’s leavings off your Persian carpets on an hourly basis and having your entire residence smell similar to a community rest room, you want the housebreaking to be a success in a wink of an eye, if not sooner.

Common Sense Makes a Lot of Sense And Is the Way To Go

The use of common sense will aid you big a lot in handling your puppy’s housebreaking. Thinking logically ought to let you know you to not give your dog water previous to bedtime if his inclination is to pee frequently at during the night time. Following his timetable as top priority should turn out to be extremely useful in having it slowly switch into yours.

Besides tolerance and common sense, regularity is likewise one of the significant factors of this dog disciplining exercise. If you suddenly draw a blank concerning the routines yourself, don’t criticize if your dog if he starts committing accidents more frequently. Bear in mind that the stakes are significant (dirty and foul-smelling house). If you would prefer to succeed in this housebreaking achievement or nearly about in any additional disciplinary drills, don’t handle it as a an amusement. Allocate sufficient time and dedication on your side.

Good luck!

Dog Behavior Problems: Help! My Dog is a Nuisance When He Misbehaves!

August 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Dog Training

Dog Behavior Problems: Help! My Dog is a Nuisance When He Misbehaves!

How many times have I hear fellow dog owners say, “I hate it when he barks non stop… or he utterly embarrassed me when he mounts people’s leg”. Dog owners usually have no problems to fill in tons of their dog behavioral problems into the above statements.

I have to admit that I feel disappointed, even sad whenever I hear dog owners say that statement. Why? Because, these owners have failed to see things from their dog’s prospective! To put it simply, I should say that they don’t understand their dogs at all.

Dogs do not misbehave because they’re spiteful, or are out to annoy or anger you. They just behave in a manner which is expected of a dog!

The fact is that dog behavioral problems that we can’t stand are not problems at all to the dogs. In fact, do you know that dogs “misbehave” for a reason or two? To list a few:

1. Dogs bark because they have something to say, something to tell you.

2. Dogs dig because they smell something underneath the ground.

3. Dogs chew because they are teething and are feeling uncomfortable.

4. Dogs chase after moving objects because they are following its instinct.

5. Dogs turn aggressive because they want to protect you.

For your information, most dogs actually misbehaved (in our eyes) because of the lack of care, concern and training from their very own owners:

1. Health Issue – Many behaviorists & dog trainers believe that at least 20% of all behavior problems are related to the dog’s health in some way or another. For all that you might know. Your dog could be misbehaving because he is sick or in pain. Bring him to the vet for a thorough check-up if he misbehaves suddenly when he has always been a good dog.

2. Imbalance Diet – Feeding your dog the wrong food, with too high in protein, fat or carbohydrates is known to cause hyperactivity. Sugars, starches and many other factors in your dog’s diet can also cause behavioral problems in your dog. Always read the label of the food before you feed him, seek advice if necessary. Remember that dogs need different type of food in different stages of their life.

3. Exercise – Lack of exercise also cause plentiful of problems. A dog that doesn’t get enough exercise is unhealthy and tends to be hyperactive, and display destructive behaviors. Dogs depending on breed type need plentiful of exercises – Do consider this factor before you get a puppy.

4. Lack of Leadership –I can’t stress enough on the importance of the leadership issue. Dogs display TONS of behavioral problems when they lack a leader. Aggressive & destructive behaviors, leg lifting, marking, mounting, barking & etc… It’s very important that you assume the role of the alpha leader!

You must understand that all dog develop behavior problems. These dog behavior problems never develop in a vacuum. They are always the outcome of the interaction between a dog and its environment, including you! Most canine behavioral problems can be controlled if not solved completely. You just got to put in some effort and understand that prevention is better than cure.

Lastly, do try to see and comprehend things from your dog’s prospective the next time your dog misbehaves. You’ll soon find that you love him even more!

Dog Agility Training for Your Puppy

August 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Dog Activities, Dog Training

Dog Agility Training for Your Puppy

You may be thinking, “When can I start agility training with my new puppy?” You can start immediately, with certain recommendations. Puppies are always learning, so every time you are with your pup you can be playing and socializing with agility in mind. Always remember, if you can control your puppies environment, you can teach and train the behaviors you want, left on their own, even in a fenced yard, puppies will learn and develop behaviors that later we may want or need to extinguish.

Expose your puppy to different surfaces. One of the first behaviors we teach our pups is “Box” or “Table”. This behavior transfers to the agility pause table. Lure pup up on a low pause table, treat them on the table. You can call the pause table anything you want. (If I was starting over I would name the pause table “Box” instead of “Table” for my dogs because on the agility course there is the potential to have too many “T” words, i.e. tunnel, tire, table, and teeter. The problem is I am also a creature of habit, and under pressure revert back to my default words, “table” would be one of them.)

Teach your pup to “Box”, meaning to get up on a variety of obstacles. In our training field we use “Box” for upside down kennel tops, the bottom of barrels turned upside down, bird crates, and more. Be creative with your pup, get them to get up on all kinds of surfaces, exposing them to different shapes, sizes, and textures. Once your pup is comfortable getting up on a “Box”, then you can begin to ask them to sit on the box also.

You can also begin to use Buja boards for motion training. Buja boards are generally made from plywood, 36″ x 36″ with a painted surface or covered surface. On the underside, there is a 2×4 box where a partially deflated ball is placed. This enables the Buja board to rock gently. At first you can reward your pup for getting one paw on the board, then reward for two feet and eventually all four. Depending on your pups temperament will determine how fast they get comfortable on the Buja Board.

Perch training can also be started with young pups. The Perch is generally a 1′x1′ wood surface that is raised by 2″x4″‘s underneath. So the Perch is about four inches in height. The Perch helps teach pups reared awareness. Again, you can reward your pup for getting one front paw on the perch and then the other. Perch training is mostly used with just the front paws on the Perch.

These are just a few behaviors you can teach your young pup. Exposure to a variety of surfaces and heights will help your pup build confidence in his future agility training.

Click And Treat Is For The Dogs

August 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Dog Training

Click And Treat Is For The Dogs

Becoming the first major improvement in dog training since choke chains and spiked collars, click and treat has quickly revolutionized itself in becoming a big hit on the training circuit. Currently, there are over 10,000 trainers who are using this method regularly.

Used in the beginning to train marine mammals, click and treat breaks down the process into two separate steps, information and motivation. While other trainers still emphasize on these two steps, they try to teach them all at once, which can confuse the animal and prolong results.

Most trainers will verbally praise a dog for good behavior, while at the same time motivating the dog to repeat his actions. This can be a good method, however it takes longer for the dog to understand which behaviors and actions caused the praise from the trainer. With the click and treat method, the processes are easily taught. In normal training, a person would say “good boy” when a welcomed action occurs and proceed with giving a treat. The clicker becomes a substitute for verbal praise and can actually catch the “good boy” behavior quicker than saying it, letting the dog know exactly which behavior he is being rewarded for.

First things first, in order to try click and treat, the trainer must invest in a clicker, which can be found at most pet supply stores. The training itself is quick and rather easy for the dog and his trainer.

Another way to look at click and treat training is viewing it as a secondary reinforcement, while food, water, physical affection and play (things the dog wants) become primary reinforcement. When you take a dog for a walk, the leash works as a secondary reinforcement. It is obvious to the dog that the leash is not taking him for a walk; the owner is, however, it triggers a reaction in the dog, telling him that the leash will let him know where he will go and where he will not. And if he reacts to the leash with good behavior, his reward will be a nice leisurely walk. Click and treat works the same way. When a dog hears the clicker, he will know that he performed a good behavior and as long as he keeps hearing a click, there are rewards coming to him. So, the clicker works as a secondary reinforcement, teaching him boundaries and appropriate behavior.

A couple advantages of the click and treat method include, 1) faster response than verbal praise. The clicker can identify the exact behavior at the time it happens, 2) it takes the place of treats. While motivating the dog to hear clicks, it will also teach him to work without the expectations of having treats given to him each time he does something good, and 3) if the trainer is working at a distance from the dog, the clicker will still work, without having to be right next him.

A good method to use when getting started with click and treat is to stand in front of the animal. Click the clicker and give a treat. Continue doing this for 20-30 minutes, or until the dog becomes startled by the sound of the click. This will familiarize him to the clicking sound, while teaching him that every time he hears it, he has done something good. After he gets the hang of it, begin by adding commands, such as “sit” and “stay.”

Click and treat has proven to be a simple, yet consistent training method with quick results. So for the trainers out there who are looking for a new and innovative way to motivate and praise their animals, get out there, buy a clicker and…..click!



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