The Infection Parvo Virus to the Dog

August 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Dog Health

The Infection Parvo Virus to the Dog

All the dog races could be attacked by this virus especially for the Rottweiler race, Dobermann, Golden Retriever and Labrador Retriever. The sign of the Parvo illness that most specific was to vomit and diarrhoea was bloody that happened repeatedly. The other sign was tired, did not want to eat and the fever. When vomiting and diarrhoea took place continued then the dog will got dehydration and lost the weight without the existence of the exact control then the puppy could not survive. The diagnosis Parvo the Virus could be carried out by seeing his clinical sign, or that more modern was with used kit diagnostics parvo with sample from dog feses.

this was several tips that could be done to prevent the infection Parvo the Virus:

-the Mother of the dog before being mounted must be equipped by his vaccination, so that the young dog got maternal immunity that enough of his parent mother’s milk.

-the Environment of the dog residence must be always maintained by his cleanliness.

-need attention fot Nutrition and the nutrient for the puppy to increase his body resistance.

-the young dog was 3 months old better not contact with the other dog that not yet clear the status of his health.

Top Dog Diseases

August 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Dog Health

Top Dog Diseases

Following is a list of the top diseases experienced in dogs. Many are easily prevented with immunizations. Those that don’t have preventive shots can often be avoided with proper care. Make sure your dog is up-to-date on all shots and make it a point to know the causes of these disorders in order to give him the best possible care.

Distemper:

Distemper is fatal in 80% of puppies and 50% of adults. All dogs are extremely vulnerable, and should be vaccinated, with subsequent boosters in keeping the recommendation of a Veterinarian.

Parvovirus (Parvo):

Parvo is extremely contagious, especially among puppies, and can lead to death within 48 to 72 hours after exposure. Symptoms include depression, loss of appetite, vomiting and severe diarrhea

Rabies:

Rabies is a virus and becomes fatal when symptoms appear. Because rabies can be fatal to humans and other mammals, state and local laws uniformly require rabies vaccination, many mandating booster shots yearly.

Kennel Cough:

This is a respiratory disease especially prevalent in kennels and shelters. Symptoms can include a dry hacking cough along with inflammation of the larynx, bronchial tubes and trachea. Vaccination, as often as every six months is recommended.

Leptospirosis:

Symptoms of Leptospirosis include lethargy, kidney inflammation, low-grade fever, vomiting, reddening of the mucous membranes and conjunctiva, and blood clotting abnormalities.
Infectious canine hepatitis:

Lyme Disease:

Symptoms of Lyme Disease in dogs will include lethargy, joint pain, lack of appetite, lymph node enlargement, and fever.

Coronavirus:

Diarrhea and vomiting are symptomatic of this dog disease so it can be confused with parvovirus. Other indications are loss of appetite, smelly diarrhea, lethargy and dehydration..

Heartworm:

Heartworms are parasites that grow and multiply, infesting the chambers in the heart, arteries in the lungs. Symptoms appear gradually, usually manifested in easy tiring, lethargy and a soft cough. If not treated, it eventually brings on death by congestive heart failure in a once active animal

Your Dog’s Health: The Basics

August 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Dog Health

Your Dog’s Health:  The Basics

The first rule in taking care of your dog is: When your dog is sick, take him to a veterinarian! Use with caution advice of friends or people who are supposed to be “old, experienced dog breeders.” Only a veterinarian is qualified to diagnose trouble and prescribe treatment.

However, it is your job to keep your dog from getting sick. Let us assume you start with a puppy. You should know something about “shots”, worm medications, flea powders, and poisons.

While a puppy is nursing, it may receive protective antibodies in its mother’s milk. As soon as the puppy is weaned, this natural immunity will begin to disappear and may be gone within two weeks. Many puppies are susceptible to diseases at this young age. Your veterinarian may prescribe a vaccination program beginning at 6 to 8 weeks, so it is important that you contact him/her immediately.

Distemper, hepatitis and leptospirosis are common and serious diseases which destroy many pets each year. Rabies is also a threat which should be guarded against in rural as well as metropolitan areas because of the possible chance of exposure to bites of infected animals.

The only satisfactory method of protecting your dog is by vaccination. Your veterinarian may want to give your puppy immediate temporary protection at the time of purchase or adoption with a “puppy shot” of antiserum which contains antibodies against distemper, hepatitis and leptospirosis as well as some of the other common diseases. Vaccinations provide long term immunity and most puppies will be started on a series of vaccinations on their first visit to the veterinarian. Booster vaccines are then advisable on a regular basis for adult dogs, to maintain his overall health for years to come.

Your Dogs Shedding and Bald Spots

August 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Dog Care, Dog Health

Your Dogs Shedding and Bald Spots

If your dog sheds a lot it does not necessarily denote ill health. Dogs that spend a lot of their time indoors are exposed to electric lights and central heat and air which can throw off their normal shedding schedule that nature built in. However, profuse shedding may have other causes like an unbalanced diet, a kidney or bladder infection or a parasitic ailment.

If your dogs shedding leads to bald spots you should seek help from your veterinarian as soon as possible. All severe shedding conditions are either parasitic or non-parasitic. Parasitic means caused by parasites such as mites or fleas. Non-parasitic means conditions created by a hormonal imbalance and or poor diet, which can easily be treated with vitamins and a more controlled diet.

Eczema is a symptom of an underlying disorder, usually dietary, rather than a disease. In older animals and altered ones, it may be caused by a hormonal imbalance due to a change of body chemistry. The skin becomes scaly and the hair falls out in patches. You must correct the cause by hormone injections or a change in diet, usually by adding fat supplements of Vitamin A and E.

Eczema can also be caused by fleabite allergy, or a parasitic condition. However, these bald spots usually appear suddenly and resemble lesions, or burns. To treat these, after veterinarian diagnosis, you must eliminate the fleas and use a local application of antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory medicines.

Bald spots can also be caused by mange. There are two types of mange, ot mange, Sarcoptic mange or “Scabies”, which has a musty odor, often starts on the head and spreads to the ears, tail, the abdomen, chest and under the front legs. Skin eruptions may take the form of red dots or blisters, then scabs. Your veterinarian can provide medicated baths; generally sulfur preparations and anti-itch topicals.

The second type of mange is Follicular or Demodectic mange or “red mange”, caused by a different family of mites that burrows into the hair follicles and most often attacks young puppies. Entire litters can be born with it. It is more serious and persistent that the other variety. In the most serious cases, pustules dot the skin where the hair has fallen out. Veterinary treatment will include oral medications and external treatments to kill the mites, but this type of mange takes a long time to cure.

Lastly, he may have contracted ringworm, a contagious fungal infection, (non-parasitic), that grows on hair follicles, rather like athletes foot. It is characterized by ring-shaped red patches covered with scales, and may be dry or moist, usually starting on the head, neck, and legs. Your vet will advise strict anticontagion measures, since it is communicable to humans. Treatments include oral medications, anti-fungal shampoos or dips, and frequent applications of iodine.

Remember, shedding is a symptom of an underlying condition that is best diagnosed by your Veterinarian usually by microscopic analysis of skin scrapings and or blood tests. While bald spots may not be life threatening, the animal is suffering and the conditions usually only get worse with time, so asking your veterinarian for his opinion is more sensible than just worrying about it.

Your Dogs Water and Beverages – Things Pet Owners Should Consider

August 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Dog Care, Dog Health

Your Dogs Water and Beverages – Things Pet Owners Should Consider

A constant supply of fresh water is essential to your dog’s good health and comfort. Water is very important, representing and estimated 70 percent of the dog’s weight. Like man, a dog can go without food for a surprisingly long time, but if he is deprived of water, he can’t survive for more than a few days, or even hours, in a hot, dry environment.

A dog’s water consumption varies according to the climate to his activity, and to the composition of his meals. Heat and exercise dehydrate him quickly. He gets very thirsty in cars or any confined space. However, excessive thirst for not good reason should be reported to your vet, because it may be an early symptom of diabetes or kidney trouble.

At home he should have a clean, full water bowl next to his food dish, another in his play area, and possibly a third one that is accessible at night. Away from home the problem is more difficult. A thirsty dog is attracted to water in the gutter, in stagnant pools and rain puddles. Clean rain water is fine, but hard to find.

Caustic chemicals used to melt snow on streets and sidewalks, weed-killers and insecticides on lawns and golf courses contaminate most standing water and should be avoided. Try to train your dog to drink only from his own bowl or what you offer him. Try to keep a water-filled plastic container with you or in your car, especially if you plan on a lot of walking or running during hot weather.

Milk is the only liquid, aside from water, that appeals to dogs and still agrees with them, (although it may cause loose stools). They are seldom tempted by other drinks and particularly dislike carbonated drinks. Milk is always another good source of protein but should not be used as a substitute for meat. Most any flavored drink should be avoided, as it only tends to irritate the kidneys, causing frequent urination and dehydration.

Dog Fleas & Ticks

August 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Dog Health

Dog Fleas & Ticks

Dog Fleas & Ticks.

Fleas.

Dog fleas are different to those which infest humans and cats. When a flea bites, it injects saliva to stop the blood clotting whilst it sucks it up. The saliva contains chemicals which often cause an allergic reaction in the dog.

The signs are :-

Bites which look like small red pimples. Black, gritty material in the coat, and areas of inflammation on the animals back. Scratching.

What is the treatment ?

Spring-clean the house and treat the dog’s favorite places with a suitable insecticidal spray. Flea tablets or collars are a good extra precaution, and spray badly affected animals frequently with insecticide during the summer months. (the flea season) Ticks The common tick seen on dogs is the sheep tick. this has a large abdomen that stretches as it fills with blood. It hangs on to the dog’s hair and sticks it’s mouth parts through the skin to suck blood.Ticks are usually found on the underside of the dog, under the forelegs and on the head.

What is the treatment ?

Try to remove every tick when you see it. It is important to extract the head, otherwise an abscess may form. If the head is left in, warm compresses help draw out the infection, combined with antibacterial washes and creams.

Removing a tick.

A good method is to get the tick’s head to relax or die by dabbing it with alcohol. Wait a couple of minutes, then use fine-pointed tweezers to extract the tick. Grasp it near the mouth parts, and give it a sharp jerk. This should dislodge it.

Alternatively, flea sprays can be used locally on ticks. The tick will then die and can be removed the following day. Regular use of a flea spray in tick areas often keeps them away.

When my own dogs have suffered with ticks or fleas in the past, I’ve always managed to deal with them myself, but if you’ve any concerns at all with your own dog, then consult your vet as a precaution.

Could Your Dog Have Anemia?

August 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Dog Health

Could Your Dog Have Anemia?

What is anemia? It is a serious condition caused by red blood cell loss. Lack of iron in the diet is usually the culprit. However with animals, anemia is usually caused by parasitic worms or fleas that feed on blood and tissues. On occasion, it can also be caused by a toxicity from exposure to certain drugs.

Is it possible that your dog has anemia? Symptoms to watch for are pale or white gums, signs of weakness and a fast pulse.

The first step in reversing this condition is to remove the cause. If your dog has fleas or intestinal parasites, start on a program to rid your pet of these pests as soon as possible.

Is your dog on any medications? Just like people, certain drugs can cause side-effects, such as anemia. If you suspect that this may be the cause of your dog’s anemia, you will need to consult your veterinarian about switching your pet to a new medication.

Treatment For Canine Anemia

The good news is that anemia is a condition that can easily be treated by providing your dog with a diet rich in iron, protein and vitamin B12. Here are some especially iron-rich foods and supplements that should boost the growth of his red blood cells:

1. Beef liver is rich in iron, protein, B complex, and B12. It’s one of the best ways of supplementing your pet’s diet with iron.

2. Kelp powder is another good choice to add to your dog’s food, as it contains iodine and other trace minerals.

3. Dark green vegetables contain a good source of iron as well. Just be careful about feeding too much gassy vegetables such as broccoli.

4. Vitamin B12 along with nutritional yeast can offer many of the same benefits as liver, although a natural food source is always a better pick. However, if you just can’t stand the thought of cutting up liver chunks for your pet, this is a good alternative.

5. Providing Vitamin C (between 500 mgs to 2000 mgs per day, depending on your dog’s size) along with 200 mg to 400 mg of Vitamin E helps with the absorption of iron within the intestinal tract. This combination is also a very good antioxidant. Give one Vitamin E a day, but divide up the dosage of Vitamin C to 3 times a day. Vitamin C is water soluble which means that it is quickly absorbed by the body. It needs to be replenished throughout the day to be most effective.

Be sure to check with your veterinarian if you believe your pooch has the signs of anemia. Get proper blood tests done to rule out any other possible problems or causes as well. Following the above dietary recommendations should help get your dog back to replenishing and increasing his or her red blood cells once more.

Dental Care For Dogs

August 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Dog Care, Dog Health

Dental Care For Dogs

Some people don’t realize that dental hygiene is as important for dogs as it is for human beings. Just like in people, dogs’ teeth can gather plaque after eating. When plaque builds up and hardens it becomes a coarse brown substance called tartar. As tartar accumulates it can work its way under the gums and cause painful infections and gum disease. This goes on in the mouths of dogs just like it does in people. You brush your teeth every day, probably three times. What does your dog do?

Teeth Brushing for Doggies

Veterinarians recommend that dog owners brush their dog’s teeth at least twice a week to keep the buildup of tartar at a minimum. Most pet supply stores carry specially designed toothbrushes and toothpaste just for dogs. Remember that a dog’s sense of taste and smell is far more acute than that of a human and the zesty, tingly, mint taste of toothpastes for people will be extremely awful to a dog. Try brushing Rover’s teeth with Crest just once and it will likely be the last time he lets you anywhere near him with a toothbrush. Use the specially designed doggie toothpaste.

Dental Chew

Some people don’t have the time or patience to brush their dogs’ teeth on a regular basis. If you’re one of these, you’ll want to care for Chopper’s choppers in another way. A dog’s natural tendency to chew is a built-in dental care mechanism. Dog biscuits break into small chunks when chewed and rub against the teeth, providing a cleaning service. There’s no substitute for brushing your dog’s teeth, but if you can’t do that, make sure he gets some sort of crunchy dog biscuit on a regular basis.

Mouth Diseases in Dogs

Dogs that do not receive proper dental care and do not have access to crunchy teeth cleaning foods run the risk of several types of mouth disease. These can be as mild as gingivitis (a gum disease that results in swollen, inflamed gums) and as serious as a bacterial infection that can spread through the dog’s bloodstream causing damage to vital organs. You owe it to yourself and your dog to take care of his teeth.

Doggie Dentistry

Dental services are available for dogs, just like they are for people. A dog’s teeth can be filled, capped, and extracted if necessary, just like a human’s. The best course of action, however, is to avoid the need for such services by properly caring for your dog’s teeth. If you can avoid unnecessary pain and discomfort for your furry friend, you should do so. Preventative doggie dental care can save you money as well. Doggie dental procedures can be quite costly.

Common Dog Diseases, Illnesses and Conditions

August 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Dog Health

Common Dog Diseases, Illnesses and Conditions

Like all pet animals, dogs too are prone to lots of diseases. To keep the dogs free from the diseases, they should be understood first and accordingly treated well with the assistance of the veterinarian. Some of the common dog diseases are discussed below:

Rabies: Rabies is a very common dog disease caused by a virus affecting the central nervous system of the dog. Rabies is known to be spread through saliva. There are several stages observed in the dogs. In the first stage the dogs are seen with a behavior change, in the second stage the dogs become very violent and in the third stage body parts of the dogs stop coordinating with each other. There is no cure till now for this deadly disease.

Bloat: This is a serious condition of the dog. The stomach of the dog gets twisted, which is due to over eating. The symptoms of bloat are restlessness and depression combined with dry heaves.

Distemper: It is considered to be the worst dog disease worldwide. This leads to fatal condition of the puppies up to 80 percent and adult dogs up to 50 percent. The common symptoms of this disease are congestion in the chest, coughing, diarrhea, gunky eyes, nasal discharge etc. At later stages it affects the nervous system of the dogs leading to paralysis. It is a highly contagious dog disease. It can be transmitted from the feces of the infected dog. This dog disease too does not have any cure.

Parvovirus: It is a very contagious disease affecting the intestinal tract of the dogs. It is also said to affect the heart of the dogs. The symptoms of this disease are severe diarrhea, depression, decrease of appetite. The feacel matter of the dog is found to be in a different color with blood stains. The symptoms appear within hours of the infestation and can even kill the dog within 2 to 3 days of infection. Hence, it is considered as a deadly disease.

Kennel Cough: It is very common among dogs. It is a kind of respiratory disease. This can be easily treated.

Canine Viral Hepatitis. This disease affects the liver, kidney and the blood vessels of the dogs. The common symptoms are profuse thirst, vomiting, hemorrhages, loss of appetite etc. This virus too spreads through the faeces of the dogs.

Leptospirosis: This disease is caused by bacteria and, even human beings get affected by the bacteria. There are several species of bacteria found to produce the disease in dogs. The common symptoms include lethargy, fever, kidney inflammation, clotting of blood and conjunctivitis. In more chronic conditions it can produce pneumonia, intestinal inflammation and jaundice.

Heartworm: Heartworms are a kind of parasites which multiply and grow, causing infection in the chambers of the heart and arteries of the lungs. The symptoms may start with mild cough, fatigue and lethargy. If it is not treated properly it can lead to congestive heart failure.

Retinal Dysplasia: Abnormal development of the retina is the disorder. This is very common in most of the dog breeds. The minor forms lead to vision problems and the acute forms leads to total blindness in dogs. Cataract can also accompany with this disorder.



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